Ecosystems for the Future

University of Victoria

Registration Fee

$275.00 +GST

Learner Engagement

18 hours

Course Dates

Offering Number Registration Start Date Registration End Date Course Start Date Course End Date
1 Not entered Not entered 26/04/2021 07/05/2021

Short Course Description

How often have you heard in the past five years the expression “I have never seen a ….fire/flood/drought/rainstorm/insect infestation/sea level rise…of this magnitude, ever.”? The world’s climate is out of balance, and in this state, is driving ecosystem changes that few of us have seen in our lifetimes. What is the scale of these changes now and into the future? How will this affect the way you work and live? How can we adapt? The practice of ecological restoration can point the way to positive actions at the ground level.

This online learning session will bring into focus the practice of restoration of ecosystems at the local and regional level in British Columbia through a series of presentations delivered by faculty from UVic’s School of Environmental Studies, First Nations speakers and Elders, and professionals whose work intersects with ecology in diverse ways. We start by rooting our introduction in Indigenous perspectives on how the local ecosystems are changing. We discuss basic principles and practices of ecological restoration on the ground. We then explore the complexity of British Columbia’s biodiversity, basic drivers of change in ecosystems, and the challenges they present in different types of ecosystems. We look at how climate change models help us understand what the future scale of change might be, and we finish up by discussing how ecological restoration principles can apply to different disciplines.

Online learning will consist of a combination of asynchronous study units and some synchronous zoom meetings to provide discussion and feedback.

Course Modules

Unit 1: Introduction to the course

Duration: approximately 1/2 hour Facilitator: Thomas Munson Welcome message: (First Nations Elder, tba)

Unit 2: First Nations perspectives on climate change impacts

Duration: approximately 1.5 hrs Presentation by Tiffany Joseph, ŚW,ȻENEṈITEL - Indigenous Food Systems Animator Interview with Tsawout First Nations Elder, Earl Claxton Jr. After successfully completing unit 2, you will be able to: • Understand First Nations local context • Relate to situation of other culture

Unit 3: Principles and Objectives of Ecological Restoration

Duration: approximately 2. hrs Presentation by Dave Polster, Polster Environmental Ltd. and Faculty, Ecological Restoration Program, UVic After successfully completing unit 3, you will be able to: • Understand the purpose of ecological restoration • Understand what a “reference ecosystem” is and why it is important • Know what the common mistakes are and what to look for

Unit 4: Ecological Complexity and Biodiversity in BC

Duration: approximately 2.5 hrs Presentation by Dr. Brian Starzomski, Faculty, School of Environmental Studies, UVic After successfully completing unit 4, you will be able to: • Understand unique situation of British Columbia’s biodiversity • Discuss biodiversity in local ecosystem

Unit 5: Climate Change Models Now and in the Future

Duration: approximately 2 hrs Presentation by Dr. Richard Hebda, Faculty, Restoration of Natural Systems Program, UVic After successfully completing unit 5, you will be able to: • Understand changing climate situation in BC • Predict what will happen with ecosystem change response

Unit 6: Drivers of Ecosystem Change

Duration: approximately 2 hrs Presentation by Dr. Nancy Shackelford, Director, Restoration of Natural Systems Program and Faculty, School of Environmental Studies, UVic After successfully completing unit 6, you will be able to: • Examine complexity of ecosystem responses to change agents • Evaluate how ecosystems respond to change

Unit 7: Historic/Hybrid/ Novel Ecosystems Concepts

Duration: approximately 2 hrs Presentation by Sonia Voicescu, PhD Candidate, School of Environmental Studies, UVic, and Dr. Eric Higgs, Faculty, School of Environmental Studies, UVic After successfully completing unit 7, you will be able to: • Differentiate between different ecosystem types • Recognize local examples of ecosystem types and how to restore them

Unit 8: Applying Ecological Restoration Principles to different disciplines

Duration: approximately 2.5 hrs Facilitator: Thomas Munson Interviews with: Adriane Pollard, Planner, and Manager of Environmental Services, District of Saanich Judith Lyn Arney, Ecosystems Director, PEPÁḴEṈ HÁUTW̱ Foundation Bev Windjack, Landscape Architect, LADR Landscape Architects Chris Krasowski, Climate Change Specialist, BC Government, and volunteer with City of Victoria Parks. After successfully completing unit 7, you will be able to: • Identify how ecological restoration principles intersect with different disciplines • Consider how ecological restoration principles can guide you to a better understanding of the ways in which climate change will impact your work in the future and how you can adapt and respond.

Course Outline

ER800: Ecosystems for the Future

 

Unit 1: Introduction to the Course

Duration: approximately 1/2 hour

Facilitator: Thomas Munson

Welcome message:  First Nations Elder, Maryanne Thomas

 

Unit 2: First Nations perspective on climate change impacts

Duration: approximately 1.5 hrs

Presentation by Tiffany Joseph, ŚW,ȻENEṈITEL – Indigenous Food Systems Animator

Interview with Tsawout First Nations Elder, Earl Claxton Jr.

After successfully completing unit 2, you will be able to:

  • Understand First Nations local context
  • Relate to situation of other culture

 

Unit 3: Principles and Objectives of Ecological Restoration

Duration: approximately 2. hrs

Presentation by Dave Polster, Polster Environmental Ltd. and Faculty, Ecological Restoration Program, UVic

After successfully completing unit 3, you will be able to:

  • Understand the purpose of ecological restoration
  • Understand what a “reference ecosystem” is and why it is important
  • Know what the common mistakes are and what to look for

 

Unit 4: Ecological Complexity and Biodiversity in BC

Duration: approximately 2 hrs

Presentation by Brian Starzomski, Faculty, School of Environmental Studies, UVic

After successfully completing unit 4, you will be able to:

  • Understand unique situation of British Columbia’s biodiversity
  • Discuss biodiversity in local ecosystem

 

Unit 5: Climate Change Models Now and in the Future

Duration: approximately 2 hrs

Presentation by Richard Hebda, Faculty, Restoration of Natural Systems Program, UVic

After successfully completing unit 5, you will be able to:

  • Understand changing climate situation in BC
  • Predict what will happen with ecosystem change response

 

Unit 6: Drivers of Ecosystem Change

Duration: approximately 2 hrs

Presentation by Nancy Shackelford, Director, Restoration of Natural Systems Program and Faculty, School of Environmental Studies, UVic

After successfully completing unit 6, you will be able to:

  • Examine complexity of ecosystem responses to change agents
  • Evaluate how ecosystems respond to change

 

Unit 7: Historic/Hybrid/ Novel Ecosystems Concepts

Duration: approximately 2 hrs

Presentation by Sonia Voicescu, PhD Candidate, School of Environmental Studies, UVic

After successfully completing unit 7, you will be able to:

  • Differentiate between different ecosystem types
  • Recognize local examples of ecosystem types and how to restore them

 

Unit 8: Applying Ecological Restoration Principles to different disciplines

Duration: approximately 2.5 hrs

Facilitator: Thomas Munson

Interviews with:

Adriane Pollard, Planner, and Manager of Environmental Services, District of Saanich

Judith Lyn Arney, Ecosystems Director, PEPÁḴEṈ HÁUTW̱ Foundation

Bev Windjack, Landscape Architect, LADR Landscape Architects

Chris Krasowski, Climate Change Specialist, BC Government, and volunteer with City of Victoria Parks.

 

After successfully completing unit 7, you will be able to:

  • Identify how ecological restoration principles intersect with different disciplines
  • Consider how ecological restoration principles can guide you to a better understanding of the ways in which climate change will impact your work in the future and how you can adapt and respond.

Closing prayer: First Nations Elder, Maryanne Thomas

See the full outline

Course Design Statements

  • ✓ Online
  • ✓ Included indigenous perspectives

Instructor

Biography picture for Thomas Munson, M.Sc., P.Ag.

Thomas Munson, M.Sc., P.Ag.

Thomas Munson holds a Bachelor of Environmental Studies degree from University of Waterloo, and a Restoration of Natural Systems Diploma and Masters of Science degree from the University of Victoria. He has worked with First Nations in the Yukon Territory, British Columbia, and Colombia, South America for much of the past 20 years. Thomas worked as Environmental Technician for City of Victoria Parks, in restoration, and management of Garry oak ecosystems. Now, as Senior Environmental Planner for District of Saanich, he works to protect these same ecosystems from development activities.